kristianne koch riddle

getting lost

“For me, childhood roaming was what developed self-reliance, a sense of direction and adventure, imagination, a will to explore, to be able to get a little lost and then figure out the way back.” 
— Rebecca Solnit (A Field Guide to Getting Lost)

I have been thinking so much lately about our collective children-the children who are in general losing touch with nature, themselves and their free time to explore externally and internally. The current book project with my friend Tytia has brought to light the importance of this subject to both of us. It has brought the lens into focus for me and the light that much stronger on what I want to say about my understanding of this life.

When I was in college I had focus on photography and learning about the medium and different ways to create stories using different cameras, different films, different alternative processes. After I graduated I began to gain focus on what I felt was important in this world-the environment and it’s impact on how we live and experience life. I knew in my heart that experiential education made sense in the bigger picture. I began leading trips into the Sierra Nevada for the Sierra Club and moved to Colorado to guide for the Colorado Outward Bound School. I was living what I believed in on a daily basis.

After I felt accomplished in the mountaineering sector of my life, I moved back to California and soon met my husband at a miserable job where we worked together as photographer and art director and discovered that we both wanted to sail off to remote places–so we did! Ever since getting back to the land locked life and raising kids in a traditional environment I have been a bit lost. We still go sailing and camping and exploring in mini sessions but it’s not the same as living in nature and the outdoors 24/7 for months on end. That is the life that forces you to find out who you really are and gives you an opportunity to discover capabilities you never realized you have if you have lived the easy life, the convenient life, the indoor life.

But since my family isn’t ready to untie the bow lines just yet I am honoring the life I respect and cherish by creating a series of my favorite images that express the special discovery of time, temperature, texture, silence, compassion, solitude and air.kristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photography
kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography
kristianne koch riddle fine art children photography kristianne koch riddle fine art children photographykristianne koch riddle fine art children photography

kristianne

Lifestyle and fine art photographer specializing in kids, portraits, lifestyle, and travel for print and web.

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